Taking the Mickey…

As the saying goes “On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog…“.  It’s far too easy for people to pretend they are someone or something they are not.  Sometimes, that’s a good thing, but more often than not, it’s bad.  Anyone can create fake profiles on social media and use them to fool people into parting with their money.

This is why social media sites like Facebook and Twitter created ‘verified’ profiles. You can be sure if someone has a blue tick beside their name, they are who they say they are.  This is very important if you’re going to share a post, provide personal details or enter into a financial transaction.

These fake sites will often use a legitimate business name to fool people.  Let’s use Disney as an example.  Everyone knows the name, Disney. It’s a worldwide brand with a certain degree of trust associated with it.  This is how fraudsters take advantage of people.  They create a fake page and get you to share its post or provide your personal details. Then you wonder why you’ve never one a holiday or a cruise or free tickets. Disney isn’t the only victim, there are well-known pages claiming to give away RVs or cars, all using the same tactics.

In almost all cases, these big companies will never ask you to share a post to win something.  If they do, be sure the page is the real one.  Look for the blue tick beside their name.  Please note, the tick mark should NOT appear as part of their profile image.  Anyone can put a tick in an image using simple graphics software.  The tick will be beside their name only.

In the image below, you can see a common trick fraudulent pages use – a full stop (or period) after their name.  Both fake Disney pages on the left have one, and in addition, the bottom one shows irrelevant category.  These are common tricks used to fool people.

disney-tick

Both Facebook and Twitter have a process that allows you to request verification.  This isn’t available for every page but is very useful for big brands, business and celebrities.

If you see your friends sharing these sorts of fake pages, let them know they are scams and likely to compromise their personal information. And of course, tell them about this blog, and Phil The Geek on Facebook!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Share or Copy/Paste?

Just about everyone on Facebook will have a seen a post from a friend which is clearly not original but rather like a chain letter.  It’s often called a ‘viral message’.  Often they have included the phrase “in honour of someone who has…” or “I’m doing this for a friend to show…“.

In almost all cases, it asks you to ‘copy and paste this as your status and NOT share it.’

So why is that? Why don’t they want you to click the share button?  It’s certainly much easier to share a post then copy the text and create a new post of your own.   I bet if you asked your friend why they don’t want you to click share, I bet they won’t be able to tell you why.  Today’s blog post explains why.

Sharing The Post

If you click “share” on your friend’s post, the only ones who will see it are those people with whom your friend shares posts.  Your friends who are NOT friends with person whose post you are sharing will NOT see it. Confused?  Think of it this way:  if you have 100 friends but you only have 15 common, then only those 15 will see the post when you share it.  In addition, if the original post is removed, then ALL the  shares from other people are deleted as well.

If you’re trying to spread a message far and wide (regardless of the content), it’s not a very effective way of doing it. copypaste

Copy and Paste

If you copy the text and paste it into a NEW post on YOUR profile then ALL of your friends have the potential to see it. We say ‘potential’ as there’s no guarantee they will, due to other factors (their timeline settings, the ability to be a ‘friend’ but not follow’ etc. but that’s a subject for another post).

If you have 100 friends, that’s a potential 100 people who will see it.  If all those 100 friends then did the same as you, then all their friends could see the post. It’s easy to see how quickly the number of duplicate posts will spread.  If you delete your post, the other 99 who copy and pasted your post will still be there.

If the post is a scam or just simply untrue, then it is very hard to find out who started it in the first place.

Remember the advice your parents gave you? If your friends jumped off a cliff would you do it too?  It’s exactly the same here.

Stop and think before you copy and paste a viral message.  Is there any actual positive effect of sharing it in the first place?  If not, then don’t. You may be doing more harm than good.

Of course, you are more than welcome to SHARE this post.  You can do so by clicking the buttons below.

Just The Facts Ma’am

#FakeNews is everywhere and it’s getting harder to tell what’s true and what isn’t.   Some sites are very clever and so convincing they fool many people.  It always makes me smile when they fool politicians who gleefully share the news, then end up having egg on their face afterwards.  If seasoned politicians, who SHOULD be media aware, are fooled, what chance does the average joe have?  

First, if you’re not sure it’s true, DON’T share it.  Not even to say “I’m not sure if it’s true or not but…”.   Once a false story is out on the net, it takes on a life of its own and people will believe it because “so and so shared it”.

Don’t be part of the problem, be part of the solution.  Make your motto: “Be Sure. Then Share”. Get your facts checked first. This brief, but helpful video, from Channel 4 ‘s Facebook Page provides some helpful tips.  

When you’ve watched that, have a look at the LINKS page for a list of current satircal news sites.

Like and Love…what’s the difference?

How many times have you clicked “LIKE” today? How about those other ‘reactions’ like LOVE, HAHA, WOW, SAD or ANGRY?

Those extra reactions are now one year old and until a few days ago clicking on them was no different than clicking on LIKE, but no more. Very soon, Facebook will be adding extra ‘weight’ to those reactions to determine the sorts of things you see on your News Feed. Normally when you “LIKE” something, Facebook decides that you want to see more of that type of content. Soon if you click LOVE or ANGRY, you may see more of those too. Just remember, everything you do on Social Media has a consequence even it’s not obvious.

Learn more about the reactions from Mashable.

Welcome!

Welcome! Let’s start with the basics. Chances are you have a Facebook page.  Are you confident you’ve done all you can to keep your profile secure?  t’s a good idea to regularly review your security and safety settings on Facebook.

Facebook makes regular updates to the site and the associated apps, so it’s to your benefit (and your linked friends) to review your security settings.  Make sure they are right for your needs.

You should always know who can see what you share. Make a start here:

https://www.facebook.com/about/basics